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Silver Jubilee Celebrations - Graduating Class of 1988 : 11th Jan 2014 PDF Print E-mail
The Graduating Batch of 1988 are celebrating the silver jubilee of their Graduation in an informal Get-together in Durgapur on the 11th Jan, 2014. For details, please contact Pankaj Chandak @ +91.9923.907915.
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30th Anniversary of Graduation - Batch of '83 : 11th Jan 2014 PDF Print E-mail
The Graduating Batch of 1983 are meeting up in Durgapur on the 11th Jan, 2014. For details, please get in touch with Gautam Guha @ +91.9434.792553.
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NITD Reunion at New Jersey PDF Print E-mail
A re-union is being planned at Warren, New Jersey on April 14th, 2012. We expect all the NIT Durgapur Alumni (irrespective of batch/branch/organization) in the adjoining area to participate. For confirming your participation or for any questions please contact the following: Dr Apurba Basak - This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it Budhaditya Bandyopadhyay - This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it / 732-809-9800
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NITD Reunion at New Jersey PDF Print E-mail
A reunion is being planned in New Jersey this February. This is for all members from all branches, all batches, all organizations who are in the New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, Pennsylvania & Delaware area. Members from further states are also welcome to join if they can travel the distance. Please let me know who all are willing to participate (and if you need to be picked up in car). Also suggest suitable dates for you (as long as it is on a weekend) so that we can plan a date with maximum participation. Also please spread the word to other alumni members (beyond this IT Department DL) who are located in these states and might be able to attend. Contact " This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it "
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NIT D ki baat hi alag hai...Talent bhar deta hai sabme # 1 PDF Print E-mail
Mr.Das Ajee Kamath, Alumni, Mechanical Engg., NIT D Class of 1986 has designed a revolutionary engine that may not only change the way we drive, but could well revolutionise industries the world over. Thinking small can pay off big. Das Ajee Kamath is living proof of that dictum. As a student of mechanical engineering at the National Institute of Technology (NIT) in Durgapur, India, in 1986, Kamath's professor was teaching him how the internal combustion (IC) engine works when the light bulb moment occurred. "He was explaining its working through the vertical motion of pistons and that's when I asked him why not make it revolve instead of having the vertical motion. That would make the engine smaller, simpler and more efficient!" His query generated so much derisive laughter, the resultant commotion buried its relevance. But the ridicule did not shake his conviction that his question resonated with validity. He went home and began to work on a wooden model based on his idea of revolving motion. It was the beginning of an idea that today holds incalculable potential. Sculpting the idea Though Kamath has chiselled away at his wooden dream, his linear career progression was a routine he could not discard. His idea remained in the conceptual stage as he graduated, worked in the petrochemical industry for a year, till the pull of the sea made him take up a job as an engineer aboard a merchant navy ship. This turn in his career reignited the passion for his original idea. "I used to study the workings of the huge turbine engines churning away in the ship as we sliced through the high seas, and I found my idea taking up more and more space in my mind," says Kamath. So whenever he had spare time, he worked out the sketches of what he was to call the rotary variable compression ratio (RVCR) technology in his head. As he grew more confident of the viability of his idea, he put the sketches down on paper, refining them and drawing up the ratios. In the process he learnt new things along the way. What is RVCR? To backtrack, what exactly is Kamath's invention? "In an IC engine, fuel is mixed with compressed air and ignited in a chamber," explains Kamath. "As the mixture explodes, the pressure in the chamber increases pushing a piston down within the chamber. As the piston is pushed down, the crank rotates and this motion is transmitted to rotate the wheel," he adds. One of his first supporters was KT George, an ex-ship engineer like himself, who runs an engineering consultancy in Kochi. It was easy to convince him as "I had studied the theory and felt that it could be done." "What Kamath needs is special machining facilities, and if somebody is ready to invest in the project, his RVCR engine should be ready for trials in a year," says the soft-spoken George with undiluted confidence. Another supporter, Jacob Raju of Libra Engineering in Kochi, who has worked to give shape to Kamath's designs, says: "It is a marvellous product and I am just waiting to see it in motion. I am sure soon we will be able to say proudly that we have been associated with its production. It will certainly be a credit to India." The breakthrough for the company came when an automotive major licensed their invention for commercial exploitation in the four-wheel and generator sector in India. However, there is a non-disclosure clause that prevents Kamath from revealing its identity till the engines are ready for production. Stirring up a storm Kamath however is irrepressible. He continued refining his RVCR concept, and then exhibited it at the Engine Expo 2010 at Stuttgart, Germany in May this year. It created quite a buzz at the expo with award-winning engineers from Volkswagen and BMW asking him to demonstrate his RVCR. The event website also chose to feature Kamath's company along with a select few from the 3,000 participating companies. Under the heading ‘VCR revolution', the organisers wrote: "Making the journey to Engine Expo 2010 from India is GYATK, whose breakthrough engine technology has created much interest at Hall 3 at the Messe Stuttgart. Patented in India, USA and other countries worldwide, GYATK's advanced, new technology centres on sequential operation of vanes inside a hollow toroidal chamber, thus eliminating reversal of inertia forces and the crank mechanism…" "We saw that the Indian national flag was flying high along with the other flags at the Stuttgart venue!" says Kamath. Fuel efficient But all this is just the icing on the cake for Kamath. What he's really concerned about is the business aspect of RVCR - and its carbon footprint. "Alternative fuel technology - fuel cell, batteries, and so on, have not matured," he says. "We are trying to get rid of fossil fuels, but just how viable is that at present? Let's face it, we need to run the engines, and we require fuel for that. The practical thing to do right now would be more fuel-efficient and lighter engines which can run on all kinds of fuel. That was our concern and that's what we offer." The fossil fuel ecosystem cannot be wished away and neither can it go on for the carbon abatement concerns, says Kamath. The solution should be a smoother transition where fossil fuel is more efficiently used to create a smaller carbon footprint. "RVCR with its multiple fuel flexibility and higher fuel efficiency is the transition and whoever controls it has a higher stake in the 21st century energy ecosystem," he says. "Technologies like RVCR, based on entirely new mechanism are of strategic importance to the oil-rich Middle East, as this technology covers for the lag with the West in terms of control on engineering expertise, and early investors get early lead in terms of adapting themselves to it." Kamath is biding his time. "I am waiting for the day when we can be truly energy efficient. RVCR is only the beginning." -An article from Gulf news To read complete article: http://bit.ly/tlZFSa RVCR technology: http://gyatk.com/
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